Remember Losing A Good Job Can Teach You 5 Invaluable Lessons

You lost your job, and you feel like a complete failure. Whether it was your fault or it happened because of reasons beyond your control, it stings. Stop torturing yourself wondering what you could have done differently! And before you start searching the classifieds for a new gig, take a moment to consider what benefits come from losing a good job. That’s right; here are five life lessons that you can thank unemployment for teaching you.

Your potential is limitless.

You are an excellent carpenter, dancer, phlebotomist, whatever. That isn’t all you are, and it isn’t all you can do. You might be able to channel your strength into a new career. Imagine you have always worked as a singer. What are the subfields of singing? Can you use your singing skills for a new type of job? Why not try out as a voice-over artist, using your vocal control, pitch, and power to add character to your voice? Could you use songs as a means to connect with students? What’s stopping you from trying your hand at songwriting? What else can you do? Take a moment to brainstorm things that fit your skill set. And don’t forget, you are capable of learning new skills. Now is the time to find out what you really can do!

There’s a whole world out there.

What do you tell a teenager with a broken heart? You know that she really loved her ex, but she won’t be unhappy forever. In time, she will probably meet someone who is infinitely more compatible than her former companion. As an unemployed person, don’t forget that the world is bigger than the place you live. It’s full of opportunities. Would your talents be valuable in a different town, state, or country? If you are not able to relocate, can you find clients or provide services internationally using the Internet? Widen your perspective. You will be amazed at what possibilities exist.

You still deserve your vacation time.

Just because you got the pink slip doesn’t mean you didn’t work hard. The gap between jobs offers you a chance to recharge your batteries. If you have the desire and can afford it, take that big trip that you’ve always wanted. If your budget is limited, choose an affordable location or share costs with a group of friends. Even if your budget is nil, find awesome things to do for free around your town. For example, it doesn’t cost anything to camp out in your backyard to look at the stars. When you do return from your vacation, not only will you be refreshed but also you will have something interesting to talk about during job interviews.

Never tear down a bridge you built. In fact, construct new ones.

Don’t leave on a sour note. Wish everyone well and mean it! When you begin searching for a new job, you might be able to take advantage of the relationships you built with former coworkers. Strong recommendations and insider job leads can help you land a new position. When you begin to interview, don’t count it a total loss if you don’t get the job. Send a thank you note and invite the company to keep your resume on file. You can check in again after a few months if you’re particularly interested in the business or if you have reason to believe that there are fresh openings. You can also reach out others who are or have been unemployed. Besides offering a listening ear, they might have some valuable advice to share.

Sometimes you need to be missed to be appreciated.

Goodbye doesn’t have to be forever. One of two things might happen when you leave your position. It might become apparent how valuable you were to the company, and they might call you back when they are able. In that case, you will either return in triumph, blissfully decline because you have already accepted another position, or tell them you’d rather explore some other options. Or, they might never think of you again. Either way, you will survive!